A Few Reasons We All Lie

Yes, we all tell lies even though we don’t like to admit it. And I think the worst lies are the ones we tell ourselves because they often do the most damage to others – quite often unintentionally. On Sunday a rather odd, but timely, thing happened to me. Right after I watched a mother deal with a six-year old child who had told her a lie, I spotted a June 2017 National Geographic magazine on a shelf. On the cover were the words Why We Lie. Of course I was intrigued. In my Blog last week Remember One Thing [...]

By |2018-10-04T08:38:59+00:00October 4th, 2018|Bullies & Misbehavior, Human Behavior|

Remember One Thing You Have in Common with Ford and Kavanaugh

Photo by Quinten deGraaf Today the Senate will have a hearing that will explore an allegation by Christine Ford involving Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Did you know you have something in common with them that you should think about as you listen to their testimony? More about that in a moment. One of my favorite writers is Malcolm Gladwell and now he has a podcast called Revisionist History, which I highly recommend. Recently he did two podcasts that focused on human memory and how flawed it is. One podcast called Free Brian Williams is quite remarkable. In this podcast [...]

By |2018-09-28T09:24:12+00:00September 26th, 2018|Conflict Resolution, Human Behavior, Uncategorized|

Try This One Thing in a Conflictive Conversation

It was two weeks with no hot water in our house and I was frustrated. Almost as frustrated as when I play golf. Two service techs had just left after their third visit and supposedly just diagnosed the final problem. The “on-demand” hot water unit needed an air-pressure control that, of course, they did not have in stock – it would have to be ordered from the manufacturer. And they had already put us through this process when they replaced the other part that was supposed to fix the problem. I needed to talk with a supervisor – someone who [...]

By |2018-08-02T10:38:53+00:00August 2nd, 2018|Conflict Resolution, Human Behavior|

Did Steve Steal $1,000,000 from his Last Employer?

No, I did not, steal $1,000,000, but I got your attention. One thing I learned this week is if I had written that headline using another person’s name and did not say it was true in the article, I would not be guilty of libel. Headlines put in the form of a question, even though they give the reader a negative impression, are not illegal. That’s why you see so many on those magazines in the grocery aisle and in your e-mail. These strategies are at the heart of what you are seeing in “fake news.” And fake news is [...]

By |2017-10-26T06:30:10+00:00October 25th, 2017|Ethics, Human Behavior|

Will Cellphone Videos Limit Cop Promotions?

Last week I wrote about how important it is for us to know how to tell stories in less than 400 words, which, if spoken, is about four minutes. So today let me tell you an amusing 400 word story about why one older policeman might be glad we didn’t have 24/7 police video recordings in the 1970s. Policeman Thankful No Cellphones in 1970s I wonder how many of today’s police officers will never be promoted to police chief because of a publicly released cellphone video.  And I don’t mean a video of something bad they did, but rather of [...]

By |2017-06-06T11:48:33+00:00June 6th, 2017|Ethics, Human Behavior|

Leading the Bullies Among Us

A few weeks ago I was at a meeting with over 200 people in the room. The last item on the agenda was for the group to agree on a future meeting site and there were three locations to choose from. As the speaker began to briefly describe the second choice a familiar voice boomed his interruption from the back of the room, “Only vote for that one if you like to watch grass grow!” There were a few chuckles and then the speaker finished his presentation and a vote was had.  As no surprise to me the second location [...]

By |2017-05-19T19:54:46+00:00March 8th, 2017|Bullies & Misbehavior, Human Behavior|

Deal With Problems One-on-One, Not in Group

Last week I saw this recurring behavior, again. And, every time I see it, I recognize it as a symptom of a supervisor who is avoiding conflict. It is something all supervisors, including me, have done at some point in our careers. What was it? It was a “training” for a whole team of mostly experienced, competent people on a topic that only one person was deficient. As I looked around at the faces of the people in the group, I saw each person become more and more disengaged. It was a waste of valuable time. A few years ago [...]

By |2018-01-02T20:15:45+00:00March 2nd, 2017|Bullies & Misbehavior, Conflict Resolution|

Final Thoughts About Trump’s Brand Value

Last November I wrote about how I thought Donald Trump was not running for President, he was running to increase the value of his brand name. In that article Trump is Running for His Brand, Not for President I postulated that because of the free media attention Trump knew he would receive, he would stay in the campaign until he started to lose, and then take his toys and go home. Since then two interesting things have happened. First, he won the Republican Primary, much to my and many others’ surprise. But, second, like relatives staying too long on a [...]

By |2017-05-19T19:54:47+00:00October 20th, 2016|Bullies & Misbehavior, Human Behavior|

The Link between Grit and Success – Part 2

According to Angela Duckworth, Grit is the product of our passion for something and the perseverance we have to pursue it long-term. In my last article I introduced you to Duckworth and her research into grit. I also gave you a link to her free and quick Grit Assessment, which takes less than five minutes. In this article I will recap the assessment and then share tips from Duckworth on how we can develop grit in ourselves and when we coach others. Grit Assessment.  When Duckworth designed the grit assessment, she structured 10 questions that help us understand whether we [...]

By |2017-05-19T19:54:48+00:00August 25th, 2016|Human Behavior|

The Link between Grit and Success – Part 1

Every four years when I watch the Olympics I am inspired by the personal stories of how hard these top athletes have worked. For every one of their stories there are hundreds of stories of talented athletes who never get there. They might be just as talented, but may not have the “grit” it takes to succeed. For decades psychologists have been studying what makes high achievers successful. Every year or so a new theory and book comes out that gives us more insight. This month I have been reading a terrific book called Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance [...]

By |2018-01-02T20:15:17+00:00August 11th, 2016|Human Behavior|

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